My Year of the Hobby

TAKE (NZ Director’s Guild Magazine)  Spring 2011

 

A distant village nestles up against the hills – smoke from cooking fires curl against the morning light. A craftsman begins his daily task. The forge is hot, the metal glowing red, he beats the iron with slow rhythm whilst turning the work and forming the blade. The apprentice looks on with awe. The village goes about its day. Come weeks end the Blacksmith will be rewarded for his skill – the village folk appreciate and nurture him, he is needed.

PHEW busy year! Drinking like a lizard, laying bricks in Beirut – work-work-work, I love this business – it fills my life with joy, hope and possibilities and you might think wealth? Bugger – Nothing in the bank. Alas – deals, minimal rates, minimal gear, double bunking – cost of living through the roof and much less offering in the commercial sector.

The year kicked off well – then I’m told at the end of the shoot, by the first-time-producer, “There’s not enough to pay you,” the lost puppy look made the news even more risible. I make to say this is my livelihood but I’m struck speechless – the ‘first-time-producer’ can’t make a $110,000 (NZFC) budget work for the shooting crew. I guess I’ll just have to await the big movie call when the ‘first-time-director’ is famous.

It’s become a bit of a tradition in my village where you do the work and you get paid – um, err… but not this time or the time before or the one after that? You could try the argument that ‘experience counts for something?’ – yet the government tells us we’re a low wage society and can’t do much about that. I guess they mean be proud of this fact and wear the badge with honour, after all Hollywood comes here to take advantage of this ‘low wage’ society and a gigs a gig eh? Ever felt like you’re being used? Yes I know you need the job so working 14 hours x 6 days a week and doing more than what you are paid is what it takes – ambition is blind until the boss’s best friend’s daughter gets the promotion ahead of you when she’s only been in the biz 6 months… yep, not fair. Oh and then you sign that contract that has you working 7 days a week where the OT is cancelled out every Monday morning… choices? Not many.

The arts managers, funding bureaucrats and advertising executives take their weekly wage while the film and TV grunts in the trenches support the delivery of product… not to mention the scripts we read and the late night mentoring (read unpaid).

But what would you expect in a country where the star struck government does a deal with a Hollywood studio at the expense of the local workers? Share the wealth? I mean that’s so yesterday and socialist and if you don’t like it go get another job – there’s plenty of film school graduates. Experience? What’s that? By the way, in case you haven’t noticed, the government has recently rewritten immigration policy inviting all comers. This can only mean less work for locals… this used to happen in the 80’s – the ruse went like this – bring a movie onshore, employ a NZ crew then fire them in the first week, the replacement crew are already pre-booked and making their way to Heathrow; now you don’t even need the pretence of local employment the crews arrive here as a complete unit and its now out of Mumbai – the paperwork reads Co-Pro – tidy – but OSH issues aside apparently you might even be lucky and get paid?

 ***

 The phone rings – TVC: a 3 day shoot – some real money! The call has a BUT attached – as in: before the TVC there’s a couple of freebies – music clip and a website promo both, all up, should take about 3 days? I hear myself saying ‘OK’. Then after a few weeks the TVC becomes a real job – miracle? I’m told (i.e. no negotiation) we now work a 12 hour day, the budget won’t work unless we do. ‘So what happened to the Blue book and the Pink book?’ – ‘Oh this is government work’. I again hear myself saying ‘OK’.

A few days go by: ‘I reckon we can shoot this TVC in a half day now that we have the 12 hour shooting day – 6 hours should do it? – (stunned silence) – ‘I should also point out we don’t pay commercial rates anymore’. Should I mention the five people hanging around the monitor, that nearly out number the crew? Should I mention the battle fought over the 8 hr day by our ancestors? Should I put my head down and just shut up?

The arts managers, bureaucrats and producers vet the business and choose the content and the way we work – (this fits nicely into the corporate ideal) only problem being is we’re now down that slippery slide again – lets call it what it is – low-wage-work in a low-wage-business in a low-wage-society… some call it ‘business as usual’. Feel like you’re being used?

My career is now my hobby but diversify I must – live TV – Sports – pictures – live to air – you cant stuff it up – hell! – experience must count for something? …minimum wage? Bugger.

This TV and film making hobby could make an old hand a bit grumpy, I might have to go back being a Blacksmith.

Advertisements